Blogs, Blogs, and More Blogs

I just added a slew of new blogs to my Blogroll, and I thought it would be fun to share a bit more information about them.  I had followed some of them for a while, but just hadn’t gotten around to adding them to the roll, and others I just found within the last few weeks.  They are all well written and updated frequently, and each of the writers brings a unique perspective and voice to their discussions.  As a frequent blogger, I look to other blogs and related websites for news, inspiration, and ideas for my own writing.  Keep up the good work!

Austin Baugh: http://austinbaugh.blogspot.com/   According to his bio, Austin is a recently graduated high school student who will be attending the DePaul School of Music this fall to study with Jonathan Boen and Oto Carrillo.  I look forward to reading more on this blog.

Erin Ellenburg: http://erinellenburg.wordpress.com/  Erin is an active brass teacher and performer in North Carolina, and she and I went to undergraduate school together at Appalachian State University.  I have enjoyed reading her informative and insightful posts.  Both of us are contributing authors for brassmusician.com, an online magazine and forum for brass players.

Mindful Musicianship (Andrew Hamilton) http://mindfulmusicianship.wordpress.com/ Andy is a graduate student in horn at the University of Nebraska, and I recently stumbled across this very nice site.  Andy’s recent posts include thoughts on handguards,  a review of The Brass Gym, and some thoughts on the daily routine.

The 500 Pound Horn on My Back!! (Josh Johnson) http://hosshornlife.blogspot.com/  Josh is a recent graduate of the University of Nebraska, and performs regularly with a number of orchestras throughout the Midwest. I think what I like most about Josh’s blog is his honesty and never give up attitude toward horn playing and life in general.

Melissa Morey: http://web.me.com/mel_morey/Morey_Horn_Studio/Blog/Blog.html  Melissa is an active teacher and performer in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, and a former classmate of mine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is also an excellent musician and writer, and I wish I’d come across her blog sooner.

Kaddish in Two-Part Harmony (Erin Vang, et. al) http://beitmalkhut.org/ Quoting the author, this page is “A conversation between an anthropologist and a musician along with a growing virtual minyan, on themes of death and dying, grief, ritual, and the interplay between music and words.” I initially discovered this page while looking for some information on Lev Kogan’s solo horn piece Kaddish, which I’ll be performing as part of a September 11th memorial concert next month.  As part of an ongoing project, hornist Erin Vang is recording a different interpretation of Kogan’s piece for an entire year.

Tubbs Horn Studio (Bruce Tubbs) http://tubbshornstudio.wordpress.com/ Bruce builds and refurbishes horns in Michigan, and his page is full of some amazing photographs of his work.  Definitely worth a look.

Advertisements

About the Author

Posted by

8 Comments

Thanks for the great blogs to follow. When last I was a horn player, neither blogs nor the internet existed. Now that I’m returning to that first love, it is great to see fellow Hill students so involved in the cyberhornaspace. What vintage of UW student are you?

Add a Response

Your name, email address, and comment are required. We will not publish your email.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The following HTML tags can be used in the comment field: <a href="" title="" rel=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <pre> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

%d bloggers like this: